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6 Washington, D.C.-Area Restaurants with Colorful Settings

6 Washington, D.C.-Area Restaurants with Colorful Settings

D.C., Virginia, and Maryland are hot spots for memorable dining

Maryland's Woodberry Kitchen has dining under lovely archways.

Eating out is an experience that is ultimately about more than just the food. Sure, exceptional fare is what can separate a good meal from a great one, but location matters, too. And these six Washington, D.C. hot spots deliver the best of both worlds when it comes to dining out — good cuisine and great settings.

Click Here for the 6 Washington, D.C.-Area Restaurants with Colorful Settings Slideshow

The Daily Meal’s picks all possess qualities that provide visitors with settings that are worthy of an Instagram or Facebook post.

For example, the building for Columbia Firehouse was an actual firehouse at one time and still preserves some of its history with its fixtures and a spiral staircase.

And another is a more-than-50,000-square-foot Korean-style spa that is also home to a restaurant that dishes out Asian fare.

Whether diners are sipping cocktails on a rooftop bar overlooking some of D.C.’s most iconic monuments or eating seafood right on the waterfront in Maryland, these haunts offer unforgettable dining experiences.


Walkable Cities to Visit with Kids (Even If You Have a Stroller!)

Considering a visit to a new city this summer? Sometimes the real gems are best experienced on foot (and with a stroller!). We found 15 must-see destinations that are huge on family fun and high on walkability so you can easily stroll from lunch to shopping and then on to the next big attraction. Keep reading to see them all.


Broken Glass Candy Recipe

This is one of my favorite Christmas candy ideas for adding to gift baskets during the holidays. This recipe is a more difficult one because it involves temperature and cooking to the hard candy stage. A candy thermometer is all that is needed though to have great success with it.

To get the best &aposlook&apos for this particular candy, you will want to have at least 4𠄶 different colored candies so you will need to make multiple batches. Also, you will need to make 4 to 6 different colors.

Ingredients:

  • 3-3/4 cups sugar
  • 1-1/4 cups light Karo syrup
  • 1 cup water
  • Food coloring
  • 1 teaspoon OIL flavoring (available at pharmacies or on-line - not to be confused with extracts)
  • Suggested flavors: cinnamon, anise, wintergreen, spearmint, lime, peppermint, clove, try to match with the food coloring that you select.
  • Confectioner&aposs or powdered sugar

NOTE: When you add the oil at the very end to a batch of the candy, make sure you do not inhale or stand directly over the mixture as the oil meeting the hot mixture becomes extremely aromatic to say the least. It can also burn your eyes!

For each batch, you use the above ingredients, you cook them all separately and pour out separately once the color and oil have been added for that particular color of broken glass. Then when you have made all your batches, you mix them all together.

  1. Sprinkle confectioners&apos sugar on 2 (15 x 11-inch) lipped cookie sheets
  2. Combine sugar, Karo syrup and water in a heavy saucepan and stir over medium heat until sugar dissolves. Continue to cook without stirring until syrup reaches 290 F on a candy thermometer. (It works best to have a snap-on thermometer and it can take up to 45-50 minutes to reach that temperature)
  3. Remove from heat and add food coloring to the desired intensity of color and the desired oil flavoring (1 teaspoon)—TRY NOT TO INHALE over the boiling liquid!
  4. Pour onto cookie sheets, cool and break into small pieces.

NOTE: You can score the candy in diagonal patterns before it hardens to make cutting it or breaking it apart easier. If you use kitchen scissors to cut apart, a good idea is to make sure that they are very flexible (well oiled) as it can take a while to cut the candy apart - scoring is preferred to trying to cut through the candy once it has hardened.

The &aposcut glass&apos comes from the random sizes of the pieces of candy and when you have finished the candy cutting, you will have variously sized and shaped sugar-dusted delicious pieces! The beauty of broken glass candy is having many colors and flavors mixed together and it lasts forever. (The added bonus is that your house smells wonderfully for days from the oils)


9 Twists on Vanilla Cake

Header image: White Cake with Lemon Lime Curd Filling from CHOW

Think vanilla cake is boring? Think again. With the right frosting and filling, you can impress your friends with some serious bakery-worthy results, even if you aren’t a master baker. Just follow the recipe! Here are 9 basic cake recipes that are anything but vanilla.

1. Moist Yellow Cake with Bittersweet Chocolate Frosting

Yellow cake with chocolate frosting is a dessert with staying power – we’ll love just as much decades from now. This version is a perfect riff on the classic with a moist, delicately crumbed yellow cake and a dark, bittersweet chocolate frosting. Get our Moist Yellow Cake recipe.

2. Strawberry Whipped Cream Cake

Berries and cream go together like Prince William and Kate Middleton: that good. This cake makes the most of both by pairing whipped cream and fresh strawberries with an ethereal, airy yellow cake. Get our Strawberry Whipped Cream Cake recipe.

3. White Cake with Lemon-Lime Curd

Citrus is the perfect partner for white cake. A tangy homemade lemon-lime curd filling makes this cake habit-forming (just try and eat only one slice). The frosting is a lightly sweetened whipped cream: easy to make and only three ingredients. Get our White Cake with Lemon-Lime Curd recipe.

4. Easy Berry Butter Cake

For any baker intimidated by frosting and decorating cakes, this recipe is for you. Simply fill the cake layers with a tangy mascarpone frosting and fresh berries, and don’t even worry about frosting the sides. It’s rustic-looking in the very best way. Get our Easy Berry Butter Cake recipe.

5. Cake Pops

Cake is good, but cake on a stick is even better. Cake pops have gained wild popularity in the past few years, and we’re happy to hop on the trend. These pops – made from cake crumbs and dunked in frosting and sugar – are perfect for a bridal shower or birthday party. Get our Cake Pops recipe.

6. Boston Ice Cream Pie Cake

The traditional flavors of Boston cream pie shine in this cake recipe. Start with layers of yellow cake and chocolate ganache, then swap custardy vanilla ice cream in for the pastry cream layer. Now you can have your cake and eat your pie (and ice cream) too! Get our Boston Ice Cream Pie Cake recipe.

7. Funfetti Cake

Prepare to be the hero at the next birthday party you attend, and bring a funfetti cake. Everyone’s childhood favorite, funfetti is just as easy to make at home as it is to whip up from a mix. Just toss some sprinkles in the batter and you’ve got yourself a killer (and colorful) dessert. Get the recipe here.

8. Vanilla Cake with Whipped Vanilla Bean Frosting

We were sold at “whipped vanilla bean frosting”, and this recipe only gets better from there. The vanilla cake base is perfect: delicate, tender, and finely crumbed. Although the flavors are vanilla on vanilla, this dessert is anything but ordinary. Get the recipe here.

9. White Velvet Layer Cake with Strawberry-Raspberry Mascarpone Frosting

Move over, red velvet. There’s a new cake in town. This white velvet cake is also made with buttermilk, giving it a tangy flavor, but has a hint of vanilla and almond extract for added flavor. A bright pink berry-flavored frosting is (truly) the icing on the cake. Get the recipe here.


5. Stubborn Seed

Tucked away in South Beach&rsquos South of Fifth neighborhood, this spot is worth visiting. Top Chef winner Jeremy Ford&rsquos restaurant offers indulgent multi-course tasting menus centered on New American cuisine. Every meal ends with crowd-pleasing snickerdoodles, served warm and oozing with a rich chocolate filling.

101 Washington Ave., Miami Beach 786-322-5211 or stubbornseed.com


Everything You Need to Know About Ube, the Purple Yam

With coronavirus making travel a tricky and even potentially dangerous prospect this year, we’re embracing the summer staycation. All week (and all summer) long, we’ll bring you transportive flavors and travel-inspired ideas from around the world, so you can take your taste buds on a trip and give your mind a mini vacation while you’re still at home. Here, an overview of ube, the Filipino purple yam that’s taken over Instagram.

If you’ve been watching Instagram at all for the past couple years, you’ll notice there’s one trend that still seems to be popping up everywhere. From soft serve and pastries to bubble tea and cocktails, foods have been looking very, very violet thanks to ube, the purple yam.

Last year, Trader Joe’s got in on the action with their ube ice cream (which is back this summer), and the current bread baking craze has collided with this striking tuber in the form of ube sourdough:

So, What Is Ube?

It’s a tuberous vegetable called Dioscorea alata, or ube, also known as the purple yam—no surprise the vegetable is celebrated for its distinctive hue. While that color may be familiar around a Filipino dinner table, it is pretty unusual for the average American diner and they’ve been clamoring for it.

Indigenous to the Philippines, the yam has grown in popularity in the U.S. for a few reasons. First, Filipino cuisine is gaining notoriety with the rise of hip restaurants like Jeepney in New York, Bad Saint in Washington D.C., and Lasain Los Angeles. With a demand for Filipino food, a few farmers have started to grow the hardy, tropical plant stateside too. But most notably, with all the attention on Instagram-friendly dishes and unicorn foods, ube is getting a lot of love because of its color.

What Does Ube Taste Like?

Like the yams and sweet potatoes on your Thanksgiving table, ube is a very versatile ingredient, but a little unique to describe as a flavor.

“The best way I describe it, is that it tastes very similar to taro,” said Michael Tsang, a co-founder of New York’s Asian-inspired Soft Swerve ice cream spot. “If you haven’t had taro before, I’d say ube has a slightly nutty flavor and a hint of chestnut in it. It’s not really recognizable for an American palate.”

Michael Tsang and his friend Jason Liu—who both grew up in New York’s Chinatown—were inspired by the classic Filipino dessert halo-halo when they set off to create their ube soft serve, which has become quite the sensation online.

Tsang explained that halo-halo is actually Filipino for “mix mix,” which blends beans, corn, and rice over a scoop of ube ice cream. It’s often a place where young Filipinos first encounter the purple ingredient. After finding some pretty low quality ube ice cream on the market, Tsang and Liu wanted to introduce diners to something a little more elevated.

Oishi Pillows Ube Filled Crackers, 10 bags for $125.99+ from Amazon

Try a taste of ube via these crunchy-creamy Filipino treats. Buy Now

The chefs warn that, like all veggies, the flavors between each ube plant can vary a bit and can be especially dependent on where it was grown. Larger yams are generally much sweeter than smaller versions, and if a yam has wintered over properly, the starches break down into sugars making the sweet vanilla flavor much more pronounced.

How Can You Use Ube?

Ube shows up in a lot of desserts stateside because of its slightly sweet flavor and rich texture, and because dessert is where it often appears in traditional Filipino cuisine.

“Often you see ube converted into jams and pastes called halaya,” explained Nicole Ponseca, owner and CEO of New York’s Filipino gastropub Jeepney and restaurant Maharlika. “That jam is used in jelly rolls, bread cakes, and ice creams. Ube is a little bit like a mix of vanilla and pistachio. It’s sweet and earthy.”

In the past couple of years, it has appeared in viral dishes at Williamsburg’s Manila Social Club as a purple frosted ube donut and as an ube tart at popular California bakeshop Mr. Holmes Bakehouse.

Ube’s not only getting a starring performance on dessert plates, though. Chef Mark Russell with posh New York catering company Great Performances said he was more inspired to use the yam as a savory dish. He includes ube in a vegetable carving station served with sauces like aioli.

“We serve ube where you would traditionally serve the Sunday roast,” he said. “As people move to more of a vegetable-based diet, we’re trying to get variety and trying to shake the rafters a bit.”

For New York-based mixologist and Den Hospitality beverage director Grant Wheeler, ube’s color and subtle flavors were the perfect addition to a The Violet One at newly opened lounge called Blue Light. The drink, a riff on a Pisco sour, blends lemon, housemade falernum, egg whites, ube and house simple syrup infused with ginger, clove, allspice, and cardamom.

“I’ve always been an impulsive consumer of junk food, and as far as Filipino junk food goes, ube reigns supreme. Cakes, candy, ice cream: ube is the answer,” he said. “I think the ube zeitgeist encouraged me to use it in a cocktail. Everyone is hyped on ube and peripherally familiar with it these days because it’s photogenic.”


Need a place quick? Here’s the best neighbourhood in Washington DC:

Logan Circle

Logan Circle is characterized by its Victoria home and colourful storefronts. Although it is mainly residential, this neighbourhood enjoys a central location and is within walking distance of Washington, D.C.’s most popular tourist attractions.

  • Tease your taste buds at Compass Rose, a restaurant whose dishes are inspired by the owner’s exotic travels.
  • Catch a show at the Black Cat, a two-level music hall with pinball, pool tables, and a fantastic menu.
  • Marvel at the detail of the National City Christian Church.

9 Wine Bars & Wineries to Get Your Vino Fix in Washington, DC

Ready for a glass of red? A bottle of white? Maybe some frosé? Us, too. Take your pick of these standout wine bars – where you can have your pick of fantastic bites, too – in Washington, DC.

District Winery

Dining Room at District Winery's Ana Restaurant - Where to Eat on the Capitol Riverfront in Washington, DC

What could be better than a wine bar, you ask? Having an entire winery in the middle of the buzzworthy Capitol Riverfront neighborhood. District Winery is a 17,000-square-foot winery-restaurant hybrid that pours the only made-in-DC wine: a 2017 dry rosé. Start your wine-filled day with a tour of the on-site facilities, which includes a flight at the tasting bar, before settling down for seasonal new American fare and waterfront views at Ana, the winery’s restaurant.

Vinoteca

Want to play bocce while you wine? Of course you do. This popular wine bar on U Street is set in a charming rowhouse and features both a front patio and a rear courtyard with the aforementioned bocce court, in addition to the dining room, bar, and private event space. A seasonally rotating menu offers a broad selection of by-the-glass wine, and on the food front, there’s a nose-to-tail butchery program.

City Winery

Pair your vino with a live show or event at City Winery in DC's Ivy City neighborhood. Combining a winery, full-service restaurant and concert venue, you could practically spend all day without leaving this 42,000 square foot space. The restaurant’s menu is composed of locally sourced dishes and, of course, an extensive wine list with 450-plus options that would please any oenophile.

ENO Wine Bar

This two-story outpost on M Street in historic Georgetown is intimate and sophisticated, specializing in three-glass flights and pairings with locally sourced cheeses, charcuterie and chocolate.

Flight Wine Bar

A stunning circular bar might be the architectural showpiece of this Chinatown spot, but the wine list is pretty special, too. Flight focuses on small, family-owned vineyards, niche varietals and regions and top-quality pours, in a selection that exceeds 500 wines offered by glass, flight, and ounce formats, plus half- and magnum bottles.

Barcelona Wine Bar

A chic indoor-outdoor flow, stylish decor and primo 14th Street location make this restaurant and wine bar a hotspot with the wait to match. While you’re waiting on a table, saddle up to the bar to peruse the list of primarily Spanish and South American tempranillo, garnacha and malbec varietals.

Cork Wine Bar & Market

This petite restaurant, wine bar and market in Logan Circle is a proven winner in a neighborhood of hotspots. The reinvented space that merged Cork's standalone market and restaurant features a downstairs tasting bar and casual eatery, while the upstairs restaurant is home to a killer small-plate menu (the avocado toast is a perennial favorite), the sommelier is exacting and the bartenders are incredibly knowledgeable. Bonus: the redesigned space pays homage to local businesses with handmade tiles from Ann Sacks, glasses from next-door neighbor HomeRule and much more.

Primrose

The Brookland neighborhood has a new go-to French wine bar in Primrose, straight from the wine-and-design-oriented minds of restaurateur Sebastian Zutant and his wife Lauren Winter. The whimsical bistro greets diners with feathered chandeliers and a baby blue bar boasting 70-plus wines, many from France’s lesser-known regions. Combine the extensive drink list with a small-but-mighty menu of French classics and you have a recipe for the coziest Parisian-inspired evening.

Jug & Table

Located on the first floor below Roofers Union, this wine bar on 18th Street in Adams Morgan gets its street cred from sommelier Theo Rutherford, who helmed the wine selections at Ripple, Rogue 24 and Fiola before opening this spot. One of the highlights of Jug & Table is its wine on tap: the bar offers eight dual temperature tap lines, which can be served in varying quantities. A list of more than 30 moderately priced glasses from small producers accompanies the tap program, plus there are wine-themed speciality cocktails, and wines by the jug for $25 during happy hour.


Low-fiber diet for colonoscopy preparation

Three days before your colonoscopy, eat only low-fiber foods listed below.
Two days before, continue eating only low-fiber foods.

Print this chart (PDF) for easy reference.

See the clear liquid chart for the day before, and day of, your colonoscopy.

Cheese, including cottage cheese

Fruit with skin or seeds (such as berries)

Breads and grains made with refined white flour (including rolls, muffins, bagels, pasta)

Plain crackers, such as Saltines

Low-fiber cereal (including puffed rice, cream of wheat, corn flakes)

NO whole grains or high-fiber:

Whole grain bread, rolls, pasta, or crackers

Whole grain or high-fiber cereal (including granola, raisin bran, oatmeal)

Bread or cereal with nuts or seeds

Dried peas (including split or black-eyed)

Dried beans (including kidney, pinto, garbanzo⁄chickpea)

Ripe cantaloupe and honeydew

Ripe, peeled apricots and peaches

Canned or cooked fruit without seeds or skin

NO seeds, skin, membranes or dried fruit:

Raw fruit with seeds, skin, or membranes (includes berries, pineapple, apples, oranges, watermelon)

Any cooked or canned fruit with seeds or skin

Raisins or other dried fruit

OK for some if cooked or canned:

Canned or cooked vegetables without skin or peel (includes peeled carrots, mushrooms, turnips, asparagus tips)

Cucumbers without seeds or peel

NO raw, skin, seeds, peel or certain other vegetables:

Cucumbers with seeds and peel

Cooked cabbage or Brussels sprouts

Creamy (smooth) peanut or almond butter

Nuts including peanuts, almonds, walnuts

Seeds such as fennel, sesame, pumpkin, sunflower

Salad dressings made without seeds or nuts

Broth, bouillon, consomme, and strained soups

Milk or cream-based soup, strained

Jell-O or gelatin without added fruit or red or purple dye

Cookies or cake made with white flour, prepared without seeds, dried fruit, or nuts

Anything with seeds or nuts

Anything with added red or purple dye

Cookies or cakes made with whole grain flour, seeds, dried fruit, or nuts

Clear fruit drinks (no pulp)

Soda and other carbonated beverages

Ensure, Boost, or Enlive without added fiber

Fruit or vegetable juice with pulp

Beverages with red or purple dye


Watch the video: Restaurants South of M St in Georgetown Washington DC (December 2021).