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Ono spareribs recipe

Ono spareribs recipe

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I usually make these Asian-inspired sticky sweet ribs as a starter and they are always a hit! Plus it's so easy and quick to prepare.

2 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 60 ml rice vinegar
  • 60 ml soy sauce
  • 100g granulated sugar
  • 3 slices fresh ginger
  • 1.3kg pork spareribs
  • garlic salt and pepper to taste
  • plain flour
  • 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds (optional)

MethodPrep:20min ›Cook:1hr40min ›Ready in:2hr

  1. Preheat oven to 160 C / Gas 3. Line a baking tray with foil and spray lightly with cooking spray.
  2. Bring the rice vinegar, soy sauce, sugar and ginger slices to a simmer over medium-high heat.
  3. Place ribs into a large bowl and season to taste with garlic salt and pepper. Toss with a little flour to coat, then toss with ginger sauce. Place ribs onto prepared baking tray in an even layer.
  4. Bake in preheated oven for 45 minutes, then turn ribs over and bake an additional 45 minutes, until tender. Sprinkle with sesame seeds to serve.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(3)

Reviews in English (3)

by RFB

The smell of these ribs was so enticing, I forgot the sesame seeds. I used apple cider vinegar cause it's what I had. Still fantastic results.-27 Aug 2017


Easy Sweet-Sour Spareribs

Try this delicious recipe from the Electric Kitchen!

  • 5 lb spare ribs, cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
  • 2 cups brown sugar
  • 1 cup vinegar
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 large green bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 can (20 oz) pineapple chunks, including liquid
  • 3 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons water

Ono ribs

3 lbs spareribs 2/3 cup sugar 1/2 cup ketchup 1/2 cup soy sauce 1/4 cup sherry 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 Tbsp minced ginger root 1. Place ribs in a large sauce pot add water to cover ribs. Cover and simmer for about 1 hour drain. 2. Combine the remaining ingredients and pour over ribs. Marinate for several hours, or overnight, in the refrigerator. Reserve marinade. 3. Place ribs on rack of broiler pan. Basting ribs frequently with marinade, broil 6 inches from unit in electric oven for 10 minutes on each side. Heat remaining marinade and serve as dipping sauce. Makes 4 servings.

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Hawaiian Style Sweet and Sour Spare Ribs
Shared by Ono Kine Friend Herman de Gala
Ingredients
4 lbs Pork Spare Ribs (about a slab)
1 can Pineapple Frozen concentrate
1 can Pineapple Chunks
1 cup Brown Sugar, packed
1/3 cup Apple Cider Vinegar
1 chunk of Fresh Ginger (about the size of 1/2 a box of Botan Rice Candy) split and crushed with the side of your cleaver
1 tsp salt (The salt is very important because it is a counterpoint to the brown sugar and pineapple and brings out the sweetness.)
1/4 tsp fresh ground pepper

Split the spare ribs apart and cut to 1.5" to 2" lengths. (You can do this yourself or have the butcher cut it on his band saw. When you get home you just have to cut between the bones.)
Deep fry the ribs in batches for about 1.5 to 2 minutes or you can slightly brown them in a frying pan with a bit of oil.
(The way my Mom taught me was to blanch in a cup of hot oil in a wok.)
You want them to turn slightly brown but not hard.
They will still be raw inside.

In a large bowl, mix the Pineapple Concentrate, brown sugar, ginger, vinegar, pineapple chunks and salt and pepper.
Place the seared spare ribs in a slow cooker and pour the Pineapple mixture over the the ribs.
Set the temp to "High" for 2 hours or until the ribs turn tender.
Place a pan under the slow cooker because it has a tendency to boil over, just to be safe.

After the ribs have cooked, drain the juice into a bowl and let it cool in the fridge. The fat will rise to the top and you can scrape it off.
Take the remaining juice and reduce it till it is the consistency of a very light gravy. Pour it back over the ribs and reheat the dish.
It sounds like a bit of work but it is worth it because you really get the taste of the ginger and pineapple without it being diluted by the fat.
Serve over rice!

Hawaiian Style Sweet and Sour Spare Ribs
Shared by Ono Kine Friend Herman de Gala
Ingredients
4 lbs Pork Spare Ribs (about a slab)
1 can Pineapple Frozen concentrate
1 can Pineapple Chunks
1 cup Brown Sugar, packed
1/3 cup Apple Cider Vinegar
1 chunk of Fresh Ginger (about the size of 1/2 a box of Botan Rice Candy) split and crushed with the side of your cleaver
1 tsp salt (The salt is very important because it is a counterpoint to the brown sugar and pineapple and brings out the sweetness.)
1/4 tsp fresh ground pepper

Split the spare ribs apart and cut to 1.5" to 2" lengths. (You can do this yourself or have the butcher cut it on his band saw. When you get home you just have to cut between the bones.)
Deep fry the ribs in batches for about 1.5 to 2 minutes or you can slightly brown them in a frying pan with a bit of oil.
(The way my Mom taught me was to blanch in a cup of hot oil in a wok.)
You want them to turn slightly brown but not hard.
They will still be raw inside.

In a large bowl, mix the Pineapple Concentrate, brown sugar, ginger, vinegar, pineapple chunks and salt and pepper.
Place the seared spare ribs in a slow cooker and pour the Pineapple mixture over the the ribs.
Set the temp to "High" for 2 hours or until the ribs turn tender.
Place a pan under the slow cooker because it has a tendency to boil over, just to be safe.

After the ribs have cooked, drain the juice into a bowl and let it cool in the fridge. The fat will rise to the top and you can scrape it off.
Take the remaining juice and reduce it till it is the consistency of a very light gravy. Pour it back over the ribs and reheat the dish.
It sounds like a bit of work but it is worth it because you really get the taste of the ginger and pineapple without it being diluted by the fat.
Serve over rice!


Sweet and Sour Spareribs (糖醋排骨)

Just to clarify before you get confused by the name of the dish, this sweet and sour ribs recipe is in NO relation to the household name sweet and sour (pick your choice from 1.chicken, 2.pork, 3.shrimp) which is on every single Chinese takeout restaurant’s menu here in North America. If you are looking for a recipe for this lightly battered deep fried chicken (or pork and shrimp) that comes with the red sweet and sour sauce, you’ll be disappointed and I do apologize. But if you are adventurous enough to learn what the sweet and sour means to 1.3 billion Chinese people, you ought to read on.

Sweet and sour spareribs are got to be one of best known rib dishes in China. In Chinese, it is literally called “sugar and vinegar spareribs”( in Chinese) which indicates the main ingredients of this dish. In China the ribs are traditionally deep fried then coated in a super delicious sweet and sour sauce. That’s how I had been making it until last year when I came across this modified recipe from my aunt in China.

This deep-fry-free recipe is not only healthier than the original version but also a lot easier to make as long as you have the right ingredients and follow the suggested recipe hereJ. When I cooked this recipe for the first time last year I was totally blown away by how easy and how good these ribs were. It makes me drool every time I think about these savory and succulent ribs covered in finger licking sauce. Plus you’ll hardly need a knife as they will be falling off the bone tender.

To make these killer ribs, you’ll need Chinese black rice vinegar preferably the one from Zhenjiang (aka Chingkiang), China. If you really can’t find black vinegar use white rice vinegar instead. In terms of meat, try to use fresh meaty baby-back ribs if you can. To make serving easier I normally have my butcher cut the ribs half across the rack so each piece is about 2-3 inch long. Leave some fat on the ribs as it will be totally rendered at the end.

Follow the simple step-by-step recipe below and you’ll guarantee to have your carnivorous cravings satisfied.

Sweet and Sour Spareribs – Ingredients

2 Lb Spareribs cut to 2-3 inch pieces

½ cup Sugar

¼ cup Black vinegar

3 tbsp Soy sauce

4 cup Water

1 Scallion, cut to 2 inch long pieces

3 slice Ginger

1 Bay leaf

1 clove Garlic, minced

Roasted sesame seeds for garnishing[/stextbox]

Sweet and Sour Spareribs – Step By Step

1. Soak the ribs in cold water for at least half an hour to get rid of blood. Clean thoroughly in running water. Drain off the excess water.

2. In a wok or medium size skillet over medium heat, combined the ribs, 2/3 of sugar, water, ginger, scallion, and bay leave. Once boiled, cover and let it simmer in low heat for about 2 hours. Turn the ribs occasionally.
[nggallery /> 3. After two hours discard the scallions, bay leaf, and ginger. Turn the heat to medium, let the liquid reduce to about 1 cup. Add rest of the sugar, vinegar, and soy sauce. By now the fat from the ribs should be mostly rendered and the liquid should be relatively dense and sticky like a maple syrup. Continue to reduce the liquid until it can stick to the ribs. Turn off the heat and toss in the minced garlic. Add salt if needed.[/stextbox]

Sprinkle some roasted sesame seeds and serve the ribs hot. Can be served as an appetizer with beer or an entrée with rice / noodles.

WARNING: these ribs are highly addictive, please enjoy responsibly.


Kalua Pig Spareribs

Say what? Yup, Kalua Pig Spareribs! Never heard of it before? Neither have I. I thought of this after recently making several batches of “local style” Chinese Sweet & Sour Spareribs for my mom, who loves the stuff. When I was browning the pork spareribs, I looked at it thinking, “Hmmm, I wonder how this would taste if I “Kalua-fied” it? And here you go!

I scoured the web looking if anyone else had posted such a dish online, and nope, couldn’t find one site that has it. There’s several takes on “Hawaiian Style BBQ Spareribs”, that use various types of BBQ sauces on spareribs, but not exactly what I’m designing and calling it as, being true to the classic, Kalua Pig Spareribs.

Literally taking the Kalua Pig preparation and applying to pork spareribs. Albeit, this is the KEY: the spareribs can’t be roasted too long where it’s falling apart like traditional Kalua Pig. It has to still stick to the cartilage-like “bone”, so you can gnaw at it like any other spareribs dish, or say a good BBQ Rib.

That said, I set my oven to conventional heat, not convection, as I wanted to be careful not to overcook it, which convection might “blow the deal”, cooking it way faster than anticipated.

Other than that, the recipe is still the same for making traditional “just like the Imu” oven-roasted Kalua Pig, using the main 4 ingredients, plus tin foil, no more, no less.

KALUA PIG SPARERIBS
By Pomai

  • Pork Spareribs, about 3 to 5 pounds (more or less, up to you)
  • Liquid Smoke, adjust amount accordingly (eyeball it)
  • Hawaiian Salt, adjust amount accordingly (eyeball it)
  • Green Ti Leaves (not the red ‘kine), enough to completely wrap around the spareribs within the foil “packet”, stems cut off (you can also remove the spine up the back of the leaves if you want to make it easier to wrap, but I don’t)
  • Tin Foil, enough to make a hat, nah just kidding lol… enough to completely envelope the amount of spareribs you’re “Kalua’ing” in the oven
  1. Preheat oven to 350ºF on roast (both top and bottom heat elements working)
  2. If the spareribs are frozen, thaw them completely, and cut them into individual bone sections.
  3. Lay out several long sheets of tin foil on your work surface (preferably heavy-duty foil if you have it, otherwise, use multiple layers of the thin stuff).
  4. On the foil, arrange Ti Leaves, overlapping each other slightly. This is CRUCIAL, as the Ti Leaves will impart a unique “Hawaiian” flavor to your Kalua Pig, so you MUST USE green Ti Leaves! If no more that, use Banana leaves. If no more that, use Pakalolo leaves. Nah, just kidding, don’t use that. lol
  5. Arrange the thawed and sectioned pork spareribs over the Ti leaves and foil wrapper in a single layer (you can probably multi-layer them, but I didn’t)
  6. Drizzle liquid smoke over each sparerib so that it lightly and evenly coats it, then kinda’ “lomi” the liquid smoke on each piece.
  7. Sprinkle Hawaiian Salt over the spareribs so that it’s evenly coated this is where you have to have a good eye in how much to use. If in doubt, undersalt it, as you can always add more after pau cook. Remember the rule with salt: you can always add, but you can’t take away. Ask Ken the “Sodium Cop”. lol
  8. Wrap the liquid smoke and salted pork spareribs completely with the Ti Leaves and tin foil, crimping the foil so that it makes a tightly-sealed “packet” of Kalua Pig Spareribs goodness. If you need, keep adding more foil in long sheets so that the packet is completely sealed at the TOP, as you want to trap in as much moisture from the roasting pork as possible. Don’t let the dripping seep out of it, as that’s where the flavor is!
  9. Set the “packet” on a roasting pan in the oven and let it roast for about 1½ hours at 350ºF. After that, reduce the heat to 250º, then let it roast at that lowered temperature for another 2 hours. This is approximately about half the time it would take to make traditional “fall off the bone”, pull-apart-with-a-fork Kalua Pig. Again, key here is you want that spareribs pork meat to be still clinging to the bone, yet super juicy ‘n tender where you can easily chew it.
  10. After time is up, turn off the oven and let it rest in there for about a half hour, so that the juices stay in the meat. Then remove the packet and open it up. This is the time to take in the wafting aroma of Kalua Pig Spareribs goodness as the steam is released… whoooooooo, da’ buggah smell so ONO! Then transfer the cooked spareribs and ALL THE DRIPPINGS into an adequately-sized pan or pot on stove top to keep warm-hot.
  11. Serve over a bed of cabbage quickly sauteed in the Kalua Pig drippings, plus coat some of the drippings over the spareribs, along with Lomi Salmon ‘n Poi and enjoy!

REVISION UPGRADE 2.0: Kalua Pig Spareribs with Sauce


Kalua Pig Spareribs with Sauce (rev. upgrade 2.0)

Follow all the steps above up to Step 10.

11.) In the pot of transferred Kalua Pig Spareribs and drippings, if needed, add more water to bring the saltiness to proper taste. Over the stovetop, bring the spareribs and drippings liquid to a boil, then add a “slurry” mixture of cornstarch dissolved in cold water, stir, and watch that the drippings “tighten-up” into a sauce thick enough to lightly coat the back of a spoon. Turn off heat and let it rest.

12.) Plate as shown in photo above, drizzling the “Kalua Sauce” liberally over the Kalua Pig Spareribs.

OK, now that we made it, let’s try it…

And? For a first attempt, WINNAHZ! It turned out exactly as I imagined it, being simply a bite-worthy spareribs version of traditional Hawaiian Kalua Pig.

However it’s my second attempt (this post has been revised) that put it over the top! As noted,

If there’s anything I’d do in my next attempt is roast it a bit longer to impart more flavor out of the Ti Leaves and Liquid Smoke, like say about 1 more hour, however no more than that. Also, I only thought of this after the fact of making all this and putting everything away, that I should’ve tried making a “Kalua Pig Sauce” out of the drippings by simply thickening it with a cornstarch and water slurry. This, being while they taste really ono as is, the spareribs look kinda’ “naked” without any sauce on it. I’ll try doing a Kalua Pig sauced version tomorrow and if it turns out better, I’ll revise this very same post with that.

While the non-sauce version was 4-SPAM Musubi “whinnaz!”, adding that cornstarch and water “slurry”-thickened drippings as a sauce over the spareribs totally kicked this dish out the park into the 5-SPAM Musubi realm. Helping that cause was the additional heating time in the pot while the sauce was thickening, which further tenderized and infused that sauce right into the pork meat.

Either way you make it, you DEFINITELY have to serve this with the usual luau food accompaniments, being of course Lomi Salmon and Poi the brand I used for both of course being Taro brand.

Following is a pictorial step-by-step of my Kalua Pig Spareribs recipe. Enjoy. -)


3.25 lbs. pork spareribs, thawed from frozen and cut into individual meat ‘n bone sections, liquid smoke, Hawaiian salt and green Ti leaves


Pork spareribs evenly coated with Liquid Smoke and Hawaiian Salt (critical that you “eyeball” this part properly if in doubt, no cook this dish lol)


Green Ti Leaves (not Tea Leaves) are generously wrapped around the pork spareribs to impart that “Hawaiian Luau” flavor if no more Ti Leaves, use Banana Leaves if no more that, use Pakalolo Leaves lol j/k


Wrap the entire contents tightly with the tin foil, making sure the eventual fat drippings can’t leak out make sure it can’t leak as you want the steam from those drippings to enhance the flavor of the meat and keep it moist


After a total of 3½ hours roasting in the oven and half hour of rest, voila!


Note, as illustrated in my Oven-Roasted Kalua Pig recipe, above is how you DON”T want it to be, where it easily gets pulled of the bone with a pair of forks


Look at all that tasty drippings the Kalua Pig Spareribs are sitting in. That my friends is FLAVAH!


Kalua Pig Spareribs with Sauce (rev. upgrade 2.0): a cornstarch and water “slurry” is added to the drippings and spareribs in a separate pot to thicken the drippings over boiling heat into a rich and decadent Kalua Pig flavored gravy… so ono.


Cutting a sparerib apart, notice how the meat is juicy and tender, yet intact where it’s still stuck to the cartilage bone… that’s EXACTLY how it should be


Kalua Pig Spareribs with Sauce (rev. upgrade 2.0): “money shot”, with thickened drippings coating the tender pork meat so silky and… so ono!

As said earlier, you NEED the Lomi Salmon and Poi to accompany these Kalua Pig Spareribs, while I also added a bed of cabbage that was quickly sauteed in the Kalua Pig drippings… oh yeah, that’s how we roll, baby!


Kalua Pig Spareribs with Sauce (rev. upgrade 2.0)

K’ den, I going kau kau now, no boddah’ me. lol


Pomai’s Kalua Pig Spareribs on a bed of sauteed cabbage, with Lomi Salmon, Poi, sliced onion and Hawaiian salt


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Ono spareribs recipe - Recipes

Aloha! We know why you’re here! You must be experiencing those familiar rumbling sounds coming from your opu (belly). Or, could it be that tingling craving sensation twitching your taste buds again? Whatever the reason you may have for finding your way to this site, we hope that your visit will repeat itself many times over. As you take off your ‘slippahs’ and come inside, we want to welcome you, "E komo mai", to Aunty Aloha’s collection of recipes, better known as the, "Ono Recipes".

Ono Recipes is a big POTLUCK of Hawaiian-style/local-island recipes contributed by people that know how to enjoy the more simple pleasures in life… cooking and eating! You’ll find hundreds mouth-watering, jaw-chewing, saliva-drooling Ono Recipes that would quench the even most savage appetite.

We invite you to join in AlohaWorld’s quest to help others enjoy the island’s cuisine. If you have a recipe that captures the tastes of Hawai'i and would like contribute to helping others enjoy, then all you have to do is submit your recipe for publication.

"MAHALO" for stopping by! We hope that you will stop by often and see what is new on the Ono Recipe list. New recipes are added often.


Gordon Lum’s Island-style Ribs

I first met Gordon Lum at a dinner party at Popo June Tong’s house in Palolo Valley about a year ago. It was a potluck and he made char sui spareribs that were so ono that I can still taste them today.

Mw-lanai-051315-laugh

Gordon Lum and Lanai share a laugh RYAN SAKAMOTO PHOTO

He always is cooking, loves to do it and is very passionate about it. I guess you would be, too, if “Lum’s Char Sui Sauce” was in your genes. I know you have seen it before in the clear bottle with the red-and-gold label. It’s been around since 1951 and was his father’s creation, and Gordon still uses the same recipe today.

Gordon joined us in the kitchen to make some of his most popular potluck recipes including chicken panang made with macadamia nuts, chicken chow funn and black bean spareribs.

STEAMED ISLAND SPARERIBS WITH BLACK BEAN SAUCE

• 3 1/4 pounds island spareribs (cut into bitesized pieces)

For Black Bean Sauce:

• 4 tablespoons salted black beans
• 3 cloves garlic
• 2 1/2 tablespoons Aloha Shoyu
• 4 teaspoons oyster sauce
• 4 teaspoons liquor (whiskey, sake, sherry, etc.)
• 4 teaspoons vegetable oil
• 2 teaspoons Hawaiian salt
• 1 teaspoon sugar
• 4 tablespoons cornstarch
• 1 stalk green onion

Rinse the spareribs to remove bone chips, etc. drain. Rinse salted black beans, hand squeeze to remove water and roughly chop. Peel and finely chop the garlic. Thinly slice the green onion.

Combine Black Bean Sauce ingredients into a bowl and mix. Add the island spareribs to the bowl and mix. If possible, line or layer the spareribs against the sides of the bowl. Add water to the steamer and heat. When the water boils, place the bowl of spareribs into the steamer and steam for 1 hour.

Remove the bowl from the steamer. Some of the steam will have collected in the bowl as a liquid. Stir, and a gravy will develop.

Tip: “Island” spareribs are what you normally will find in Chinatown. Ask the butcher to cut the spareribs with a bandsaw rather than chopping it with a cleaver there will be fewer shattered bones to deal with. “Mainland” spareribs are what you would find in supermarkets and also can be used.


Ingredients

  • 2 racks baby back ribs (about 5 to 6 pounds)
  • 1 whole unpeeled bulb garlic, halved horizontally across the mid-section
  • 1 medium Spanish onion, coarsely chopped
  • 1 medium carrot, coarsely chopped
  • 1/2 cup tomato puree
  • 1 cup sake
  • 2 Tbs. rice vinegar
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 3 Tbs. sugar
  • 2 Tbs. red miso
  • 1 Tbs. tobanjan
  • 1 tsp. whole black peppercorns
  • 1 Tbs. sesame seeds, for accent

Recipes

The following are recipes and cooking demonstrations, collectively presented over the years The Tasty Island has been online. Most are tried-and-proven personal favorites of Pomai, the editor and owner of The Tasty Island, along with others contributed by family, friends, coworkers and The Tasty Island readers. Enjoy!

Pupus (appetizers) and Starters

Sides & Misc. Dishes

Main Entrees

Desserts, Baked Goods & Sweet Treats

27 thoughts on &ldquo Recipes &rdquo

how do you make mundoo filling?

made book with you recipe but added ham hocks it came super good! thanks for a great recipe.

can u give me the li hing mui ice cake recipe? thanks

Help… my family always had this bean and it was called Tada Mush (sp??)and after my elders all passed, i could never find this. Does anyone know what I am talking about?

Not sure if this is what you’re referring to, however could it be this?…


Tremocas, a.k.a. Lupini beans from the 2008 Honolulu Portuguese Festa

Tadamush, tremocos, lupini beans. My absolutely favorite snack. Cooking them as I type!

You have so many wonderful recipes! I’d love to have a “special” category in my recipe box!

Wooh!! Great blog. I am glad that i found your post. There is so much to make and i am foodie . Thanks for wonderful article. I made my list, according to prepared list, i will make cuisine. :)

Very cool! There’s quite a few Hawaii Foodbloggers out there now, and most have The Tasty Island as a link. I need to give a try on this recipe- can’t wait!! Thanks!!

Is there such a thing as Hawaiian pork jerky? I’ve seen it mentioned a few places, b ut can’t find a recipe.

I did try a pork jerky once, however can’t specifically remember if it was a made-in-Hawaii product. I do recall it being done Teriyaki style, as seems the most popular jerky flavor nowadays.

Similar to that (especially if you hunt for wild boar), I highly recommend you check out my late Uncle’s recipe for “Big Island Style” Smoked Meat….

Hi, do you have a recipe for authentic butter rolls?

Who’s Butter Rolls are you seeking the recipe for? Komoda Store in Makawao, Maui is the most famous one I know of. Then there’s Liliha Bakery’s Butter Rolls (served with their “Nuclear” Jelly). Then of course there’s Nanding’s Spanish Rolls, which are very buttery. Of which to note, Nanding’s will soon open a new bakery location on Kapahulu Avenue, right behind Zippy’s. Interesting demo’.

You should do a roast pork recipe. The plate lunch one, like tsukenjo’s.

Roast Pork is actually a dish I’ve never personally made before. Sounds easy enough to do though, similar to making a beef pot roast I imagine.

Here’s one of my Roast Pork faves, from Ono Steak and Seafood in ‘Nalo, wit’ “Gravy all Ovah”, baby!…


Ono Steak & Seafood Roast Pork with “Gravy all ovah”!

Once I find a really ono recipe for local style Roast Pork (with KILLER GRAVY!), and make it successfully myself (or at least tried it), I’ll add the recipe here.

1 round onion cut into rings

garlic powder and a a couple garlic cloves cut into slivers

.5 cup Aloha BBQ Sauce (NOT Teri sauce)

cup white wine or chicken broth and 2 tbls Worcestershire sauce

Spray Pam on roasting pan

put slivered garlic throughout roast via knife slits, wet roast with a splash of BBQsprinkle roast with garlic powder and herbs. Place about a quarter of onions on bottom of pan and rest around all over. Pour in liquid, tent loosely with foil. Roast at 300 for 3 hours. Check after 2.5 hours add more broth or water or white wine if needed. Take out at three, pour liquid and most onions into pot, add Wondra to thicken (allow at least 2 minutes of a low boil after added to remove flour taste. Corn starch will also work here but you cannot add directly), flavor.

Roast Pork with Brown Onion Gravy

If anyone has circa 1930 through 1950’s photos of Wahiawa eateries

and other businesses I would love to have a copy. Please contact me

A Hawaiian friend of mine has told me about a fantastic sausage called Portagee. He has asked me to try making some using pork we raise. Does anyone have an authentic recipe they would share. He says it is mostly served for breakfast with eggs and rice and it’s “broke the mouth”!

“Portagee” is the Pidgin English way of saying Portuguese, hence it’s Portuguese Sausage. I don’t have any family recipe for it, but those who do make it themselves swear it’s way better than the many store-bought varieties available here in Hawaii.

To note, Hawaii’s Portuguese Sausage (the commercial type) have a unique flavor that’s quite different than, say the ones from the mainland, such as Gaspar’s and Silva’s. Here in Hawaii we have many commercial brands of Portuguese Sausage, including Frank’s (Big Island), Uncle Louie’s (Maui), and from Oahu, Rego’s Purity, Redondo’s, Gouveia, Pacific and Kukui, plus a few more I may have missed.

Does anyone have a recipe for Puka dogs creamy lemon garlic sauce. We’ve been to Kauai 4 times and would love to make them at home but the recipes we’ve tried just don’t compare. We’d also like a recipe for their mango relish.
Thanks

Made Shoyu Chicken (thighs only – on sale .39 cents a pound!) for dinner tonight. Too simple for a recipe – shoyu, mirin, sato, ginger slices and a little chili pepper – but serious falling off the bone comfort food with some hot gohan and homemade tsukemono (no potato mac salad tonight). Had to fight the dog for it! He’s a serious rice burning pup :D Simple food really is the often the best food. Probably why those old line island drive inns and mom and pop food markets still do so well with old school recipes to this day. Food that reminds us all of when we were young. Which for me was a LONG time ago! :D

Someone help a Braddah out! My wife is craving yummy’s potato salad, but we live in mainland. Ah, no can. I like know the how to make the recipe so I don’t need to fly her thousand miles across sea to eat just small kine.

You can probably apply this “secret ingrediment” trick to your potato salad by simply adding about 1/4 cup of whole milk, not 2% or skim (more milk if you making a big batch) to the Best Foods/Hellman’s (gotta’ be that brand) mayonnaise that will be used to dress the potato salad. I learned that trick from a Waianae Drive-In Macaroni Salad recipe. The milk makes it taste more smooth, creamy and really ono! That old school local style Mac Salad flavah!

While not local style, I would highly recommend this Loaded Baked Potato Salad recipe:
https://dinnerthendessert.com/loaded-baked-potato-salad/

My sister makes it all the time, and it’s so ono! It really taste as described, especially with the bacon bits in it! The combination of Sour Cream and Mayonnaise is also what makes it great. Use chopped green onion or chives instead of Parsley.

Do you have a recipe for using chopped up Li Hing Mangos in cookies? Not sure if that is taste compatible for cookies.

would like a recipe for plain banana pie with out pudding or cream filling

I love the recipes you have here. I plan on making the “Loaded Baked Potato Salad”. I have never been good at making salads but I’m gonna try dis one. Do you have a recipe for the small coconut pies they sell at Tamashiro market? If so, can you please add that to your list of recipes. I’ve looked all over the internet but can’t find one like it. Mahalo.


Watch the video: Die perfekten Spareribs - So gehts! Galileo. ProSieben (December 2021).