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This Is How Much the Average Household Spends Eating Out Versus Eating at Home

This Is How Much the Average Household Spends Eating Out Versus Eating at Home

We've got the national average

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In 2018, the average U.S. For food, a similar amount of cash was spent on food away from home versus food at home. But which one won our wallets?

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According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor, an average of $3,459 was spent on takeout, in-restaurant dining and fast food meals, while $4,464 was spent on grub prepared at home — a $1,005 difference between the two. So if you think you’re spending way more on carry-out than you are on the food you make at home, you might be, but collectively, the U.S. population is not.

And this is the way it’s been for the past three years. The numbers have risen slightly, but from 2016 through 2018, about 45% of the cash spent on food is on food other people prepare for us. Depending on how you prefer to save money, you might be cool with the amount you spend on eating out. If you’re not, definitely stay away from the most expensive restaurant in your state.


Here's What the Average American Spends on Restaurants and Takeout

We all love a good restaurant meal, and there's something to be said about feasting on delicacies without having to do an ounce of cooking or cleanup yourself. But while there's certainly nothing wrong with indulging every so often, it seems as though Americans are taking the concept of eating out to an extreme. From 2015 to 2016, for the first time in history, Americans spent more money at bars and restaurants ($54.857 billion) than they did on groceries ($52.503 billion). And while data from previous years still show grocery sales edging out restaurants and takeout, that shrinking margin points to a serious spending problem among consumers.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2014, the average American household spent $2,787 on restaurant meals and takeout, compared to $3,971 on groceries. But in 2015, the average amount spent on restaurants and takeout jumped $221 to $3,008. Grocery spending, by contrast, increased just $44 per household to $4,015. What this tells us is that dining at restaurants and ordering takeout aren't just luxuries anymore. Rather, they're becoming the norm. And our finances are hurting as a result.

Image source: Getty Images.


Here's What the Average American Spends on Restaurants and Takeout

We all love a good restaurant meal, and there's something to be said about feasting on delicacies without having to do an ounce of cooking or cleanup yourself. But while there's certainly nothing wrong with indulging every so often, it seems as though Americans are taking the concept of eating out to an extreme. From 2015 to 2016, for the first time in history, Americans spent more money at bars and restaurants ($54.857 billion) than they did on groceries ($52.503 billion). And while data from previous years still show grocery sales edging out restaurants and takeout, that shrinking margin points to a serious spending problem among consumers.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2014, the average American household spent $2,787 on restaurant meals and takeout, compared to $3,971 on groceries. But in 2015, the average amount spent on restaurants and takeout jumped $221 to $3,008. Grocery spending, by contrast, increased just $44 per household to $4,015. What this tells us is that dining at restaurants and ordering takeout aren't just luxuries anymore. Rather, they're becoming the norm. And our finances are hurting as a result.

Image source: Getty Images.


Here's What the Average American Spends on Restaurants and Takeout

We all love a good restaurant meal, and there's something to be said about feasting on delicacies without having to do an ounce of cooking or cleanup yourself. But while there's certainly nothing wrong with indulging every so often, it seems as though Americans are taking the concept of eating out to an extreme. From 2015 to 2016, for the first time in history, Americans spent more money at bars and restaurants ($54.857 billion) than they did on groceries ($52.503 billion). And while data from previous years still show grocery sales edging out restaurants and takeout, that shrinking margin points to a serious spending problem among consumers.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2014, the average American household spent $2,787 on restaurant meals and takeout, compared to $3,971 on groceries. But in 2015, the average amount spent on restaurants and takeout jumped $221 to $3,008. Grocery spending, by contrast, increased just $44 per household to $4,015. What this tells us is that dining at restaurants and ordering takeout aren't just luxuries anymore. Rather, they're becoming the norm. And our finances are hurting as a result.

Image source: Getty Images.


Here's What the Average American Spends on Restaurants and Takeout

We all love a good restaurant meal, and there's something to be said about feasting on delicacies without having to do an ounce of cooking or cleanup yourself. But while there's certainly nothing wrong with indulging every so often, it seems as though Americans are taking the concept of eating out to an extreme. From 2015 to 2016, for the first time in history, Americans spent more money at bars and restaurants ($54.857 billion) than they did on groceries ($52.503 billion). And while data from previous years still show grocery sales edging out restaurants and takeout, that shrinking margin points to a serious spending problem among consumers.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2014, the average American household spent $2,787 on restaurant meals and takeout, compared to $3,971 on groceries. But in 2015, the average amount spent on restaurants and takeout jumped $221 to $3,008. Grocery spending, by contrast, increased just $44 per household to $4,015. What this tells us is that dining at restaurants and ordering takeout aren't just luxuries anymore. Rather, they're becoming the norm. And our finances are hurting as a result.

Image source: Getty Images.


Here's What the Average American Spends on Restaurants and Takeout

We all love a good restaurant meal, and there's something to be said about feasting on delicacies without having to do an ounce of cooking or cleanup yourself. But while there's certainly nothing wrong with indulging every so often, it seems as though Americans are taking the concept of eating out to an extreme. From 2015 to 2016, for the first time in history, Americans spent more money at bars and restaurants ($54.857 billion) than they did on groceries ($52.503 billion). And while data from previous years still show grocery sales edging out restaurants and takeout, that shrinking margin points to a serious spending problem among consumers.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2014, the average American household spent $2,787 on restaurant meals and takeout, compared to $3,971 on groceries. But in 2015, the average amount spent on restaurants and takeout jumped $221 to $3,008. Grocery spending, by contrast, increased just $44 per household to $4,015. What this tells us is that dining at restaurants and ordering takeout aren't just luxuries anymore. Rather, they're becoming the norm. And our finances are hurting as a result.

Image source: Getty Images.


Here's What the Average American Spends on Restaurants and Takeout

We all love a good restaurant meal, and there's something to be said about feasting on delicacies without having to do an ounce of cooking or cleanup yourself. But while there's certainly nothing wrong with indulging every so often, it seems as though Americans are taking the concept of eating out to an extreme. From 2015 to 2016, for the first time in history, Americans spent more money at bars and restaurants ($54.857 billion) than they did on groceries ($52.503 billion). And while data from previous years still show grocery sales edging out restaurants and takeout, that shrinking margin points to a serious spending problem among consumers.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2014, the average American household spent $2,787 on restaurant meals and takeout, compared to $3,971 on groceries. But in 2015, the average amount spent on restaurants and takeout jumped $221 to $3,008. Grocery spending, by contrast, increased just $44 per household to $4,015. What this tells us is that dining at restaurants and ordering takeout aren't just luxuries anymore. Rather, they're becoming the norm. And our finances are hurting as a result.

Image source: Getty Images.


Here's What the Average American Spends on Restaurants and Takeout

We all love a good restaurant meal, and there's something to be said about feasting on delicacies without having to do an ounce of cooking or cleanup yourself. But while there's certainly nothing wrong with indulging every so often, it seems as though Americans are taking the concept of eating out to an extreme. From 2015 to 2016, for the first time in history, Americans spent more money at bars and restaurants ($54.857 billion) than they did on groceries ($52.503 billion). And while data from previous years still show grocery sales edging out restaurants and takeout, that shrinking margin points to a serious spending problem among consumers.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2014, the average American household spent $2,787 on restaurant meals and takeout, compared to $3,971 on groceries. But in 2015, the average amount spent on restaurants and takeout jumped $221 to $3,008. Grocery spending, by contrast, increased just $44 per household to $4,015. What this tells us is that dining at restaurants and ordering takeout aren't just luxuries anymore. Rather, they're becoming the norm. And our finances are hurting as a result.

Image source: Getty Images.


Here's What the Average American Spends on Restaurants and Takeout

We all love a good restaurant meal, and there's something to be said about feasting on delicacies without having to do an ounce of cooking or cleanup yourself. But while there's certainly nothing wrong with indulging every so often, it seems as though Americans are taking the concept of eating out to an extreme. From 2015 to 2016, for the first time in history, Americans spent more money at bars and restaurants ($54.857 billion) than they did on groceries ($52.503 billion). And while data from previous years still show grocery sales edging out restaurants and takeout, that shrinking margin points to a serious spending problem among consumers.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2014, the average American household spent $2,787 on restaurant meals and takeout, compared to $3,971 on groceries. But in 2015, the average amount spent on restaurants and takeout jumped $221 to $3,008. Grocery spending, by contrast, increased just $44 per household to $4,015. What this tells us is that dining at restaurants and ordering takeout aren't just luxuries anymore. Rather, they're becoming the norm. And our finances are hurting as a result.

Image source: Getty Images.


Here's What the Average American Spends on Restaurants and Takeout

We all love a good restaurant meal, and there's something to be said about feasting on delicacies without having to do an ounce of cooking or cleanup yourself. But while there's certainly nothing wrong with indulging every so often, it seems as though Americans are taking the concept of eating out to an extreme. From 2015 to 2016, for the first time in history, Americans spent more money at bars and restaurants ($54.857 billion) than they did on groceries ($52.503 billion). And while data from previous years still show grocery sales edging out restaurants and takeout, that shrinking margin points to a serious spending problem among consumers.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2014, the average American household spent $2,787 on restaurant meals and takeout, compared to $3,971 on groceries. But in 2015, the average amount spent on restaurants and takeout jumped $221 to $3,008. Grocery spending, by contrast, increased just $44 per household to $4,015. What this tells us is that dining at restaurants and ordering takeout aren't just luxuries anymore. Rather, they're becoming the norm. And our finances are hurting as a result.

Image source: Getty Images.


Here's What the Average American Spends on Restaurants and Takeout

We all love a good restaurant meal, and there's something to be said about feasting on delicacies without having to do an ounce of cooking or cleanup yourself. But while there's certainly nothing wrong with indulging every so often, it seems as though Americans are taking the concept of eating out to an extreme. From 2015 to 2016, for the first time in history, Americans spent more money at bars and restaurants ($54.857 billion) than they did on groceries ($52.503 billion). And while data from previous years still show grocery sales edging out restaurants and takeout, that shrinking margin points to a serious spending problem among consumers.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2014, the average American household spent $2,787 on restaurant meals and takeout, compared to $3,971 on groceries. But in 2015, the average amount spent on restaurants and takeout jumped $221 to $3,008. Grocery spending, by contrast, increased just $44 per household to $4,015. What this tells us is that dining at restaurants and ordering takeout aren't just luxuries anymore. Rather, they're becoming the norm. And our finances are hurting as a result.

Image source: Getty Images.